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Posted 8 hours ago | Reblog | 35 Notes
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» Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 9: The First Half of the Second Act - Helping Writers Become Authors

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Posted 10 hours ago | Reblog | 14 Notes

» Monday Tropes: Coughing Equals Death

paigereiring:

You know this. Every time you read about character who starts coughing and then brushes it off with “it’s nothing” is dead. Like, super dead. You don’t know if it’s going to be because they have a terminal illness or are about to turn into some insane creature, but you know they’re dead just…

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Posted 12 hours ago | Reblog | 16 Notes

Question from the-ashes-we-ascend 

thedancingwriter:

This goes hand-in-hand with that long rant I did the other day, which you can find here

Question: 

"I’m trying to write my first novel for an ongoing series, I have posted some content for it on Tumblr and here a few times but nothing much due to my concern of quality and potential theft. My dilemma is that I’m planning on rewriting/revising it, and I’m wondering if I should post the completed chapters in hopes of getting a small fan base first before approaching an agent? Or if I should just write the book first and approach an agent without posting any of the content? My concern is mostly theft since I’ve heard it and seen is happen so much, but I don’t have money to shell out for proper copyright protection; especially if I decide to edit and revise it again. 

While I’ve been told before that as long as I have evidence that supports the work and material is mine; such as keeping the material on my hard drive, or sending my work to myself (basically anything with a date), I would be fine. But I did get in touch with a local copyright lawyer and he said that it might not stand up in court if I took such measures, while a federal copyright would (assuming such a thing would happen). I know I probably sound a little arrogant or something, but it’s a real concern for both myself, and my mother who’s been really trying to help me with this thing. 

This brings me to my other concern, if I decide to go with publishing content on social media sites prior to getting an agent, how do I go about promoting it in a such a way that would get people interested and not just appear spammy? Usually I like to make photo edits but the trouble with that is it’s just that an “edit”. I don’t have the artistic skill, nor the money to hire someone to do original work for me, and I don’t want to be slammed for stealing and editing someone’s work; especially using photo refs of actors and stuff. 

Maybe I’m making a big deal out of this, but I would really like any advice I can get right now.

Any thoughts?

P.S. Would anyone here with professional or good editing skills be willing to edit my work for free, or in trade for something like drabbles or graphics?

Answer:

I pretty much advise against posting your entire novel on the internet just to build a fanbase before seeking out an agent. Posting one chapter is fine, because this is pretty much the equivalent of what Amazon’s ‘Look Inside’ feature does for books published by reputable authors or publishers. But you want your books to sell, and so if a lot of people read your entire book before it’s published, it may not sell as well as you want. 

And I’m not sure if this holds true anymore, but sometimes agents and publishers will look at an entire book posted online as a book that’s technically been published already, and they want first rights to a book. I do believe that agents or publishers interested in your work will look you up on the internet. 

One chapter will hopefully be enough to draw interest. But keep in mind that there are people who say they want to buy your book, but that doesn’t mean they will once it releases, for whatever reason. 

However, in order to build a fanbase before publication, you’ll need to build your platform that doesn’t involve having to post large chunks of your novel online. And I wouldn’t even necessarily call it a fanbase. That’s a misnomer, especially because a great deal of them obviously haven’t officially read your book. They truly only become fans after they’ve bought your book, read it, and loved it. All you can do is put yourself out there in front of potential customers through your platform. But you’ve got to know just how to use your platform to get yourself out there. 

For example, I find that Tumblr has a lot of teen writers, more so than any other platform out there. Since I write YA, I find Tumblr to be a fantastic platform for me, where I provide writing advice to a lot of aspiring writers. Your platform is basically about providing a service to your potential fanbase. However, you should not provide the service solely to make those people your customers. Remember, these are people you are interacting with, not dollars signs or numbers. You should not expect anything from them. At all. It sounds contradictory to the purpose of a platform, but I love talking to all of my followers and providing them with advice that I hope will make them the next great writer. I see everyone seeking my advice as the next generation of writers, and that is what I want to foster using this blog. So, in my opinion, your efforts should be noble, not selfish. 

Even so, you will start seeing the benefits, I promise. I’m just saying you shouldn’t expect anything because, again, these are real people you are talking to, not some algorithm you need to figure out to turn those people into customers. 

Social media is about human interaction, connecting with others who share your interests. 

I love Tumblr. I love all of my followers. Tumblr has been the most enjoyable social media for me. And you should have fun with your platform. Don’t treat it begrudgingly. 

So how do you build this platform? This took me several months to figure out, until AEC started helping out its authors with platforming building. 

Read More

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Posted 13 hours ago | Reblog | 100 Notes
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Posted 13 hours ago | Reblog | 19 Notes

Day 14: Definitely and defiantly 

hello095:

This is the devil or autocorrect. These two words don’t sound the same but it goes to show that humans are better at computers at something…

“Definitely” is used to agree:

“I am definitely going. What about you?”
Definitely! I’ll be there by six.”


Whereas “defiantly” is used rebelliously:

“He kicked at the teacher defiantly as he was dragged away to the headmaster’s office.”

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Posted 13 hours ago | Reblog | 1370 Notes

» Learning the Essentials of Plotting Your Novel

fictionwritingtips:

I get a lot of questions about plotting, so I figured I’d write up some tips on getting started. Learning how to plot your novel can be difficult, but it’s really all about knowing what your characters want and how they’re going to get it or attempt to get it. A character with motivations and…

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Posted 14 hours ago | Reblog | 56 Notes
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Posted 14 hours ago | Reblog | 18 Notes

» #2: Growing Up, Don’t Mess It Up

cadetgris:

As a writer it is nearly impossible to avoid writing about children, and to me it’s very important that it’s done with a sense of realism in mind. Even though there are (of course) many more mistakes, here’s some tips on the problems I see and sigh at the most when reading a story.

1-11:…

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Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog | 52 Notes
writersrelief:

Should You Fire Your Literary Agent? The 10 Signs That It’s Time To Say Good-bye - Writer’s Relief Blog

It’s not easy to make the decision to leave your literary agency. No writer wants to fire a literary agent. Usually, literary agents and writers enter into their partnership with lots of enthusiasm and optimism. Most writers would rather try to work out any problems with their current agent than start the entire process of finding literary agent representation all over again.
That said, sometimes the signs point toward firing a literary agent. If you’ve been on the fence about whether to stay with your literary agent or say good-bye, this article will help you decide.

writersrelief:

Should You Fire Your Literary Agent? The 10 Signs That It’s Time To Say Good-bye - Writer’s Relief Blog

It’s not easy to make the decision to leave your literary agency. No writer wants to fire a literary agent. Usually, literary agents and writers enter into their partnership with lots of enthusiasm and optimism. Most writers would rather try to work out any problems with their current agent than start the entire process of finding literary agent representation all over again.

That said, sometimes the signs point toward firing a literary agent. If you’ve been on the fence about whether to stay with your literary agent or say good-bye, this article will help you decide.

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Posted 15 hours ago | Reblog | 52 Notes
writersrelief:

Should You Fire Your Literary Agent? The 10 Signs That It’s Time To Say Good-bye - Writer’s Relief Blog

It’s not easy to make the decision to leave your literary agency. No writer wants to fire a literary agent. Usually, literary agents and writers enter into their partnership with lots of enthusiasm and optimism. Most writers would rather try to work out any problems with their current agent than start the entire process of finding literary agent representation all over again.
That said, sometimes the signs point toward firing a literary agent. If you’ve been on the fence about whether to stay with your literary agent or say good-bye, this article will help you decide.

writersrelief:

Should You Fire Your Literary Agent? The 10 Signs That It’s Time To Say Good-bye - Writer’s Relief Blog

It’s not easy to make the decision to leave your literary agency. No writer wants to fire a literary agent. Usually, literary agents and writers enter into their partnership with lots of enthusiasm and optimism. Most writers would rather try to work out any problems with their current agent than start the entire process of finding literary agent representation all over again.

That said, sometimes the signs point toward firing a literary agent. If you’ve been on the fence about whether to stay with your literary agent or say good-bye, this article will help you decide.

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Posted 16 hours ago | Reblog | 22 Notes

» Realism is Fake

literallycait:

A great article on writing dialogue, including the use of dialogue tags, realism in word choice and sentence structure, and nonverbal cues.  Mandatory reading for everyone who thinks that writing out accents with apostrophes and misspellings is a Good Idea.

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Posted 16 hours ago | Reblog | 83 Notes

maxkirin:

Writing Advice from: Neil Gaiman

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

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